Cars

Business Reply Mail and Postal Indicias

Features

Contact

Description

Your artwork will always come to pre-press if it is new art or if anything has changed with the art. They get it ready for the presses by making sure all the colors separate properly, that you've complied with postal regulations, and that your design is actually printable (some things are not!). They get the artwork to a point where it can be printed on plates, which will be inked, put on the press, and used to print your envelopes.

Pre-press can also make changes to your art if necessary, in the event that you cannot make the changes yourself. Some changes may incur fees, but you should be notified of these. Most pre-press departments also handle typesetting. If you have absolutely nothing, they can at least type up an address for you, in the font of your choice and stick it on an envelope!

https://www.phcolorsorter.com/html/en/products/graincolorsorter/697.html

I know this ruins the fun, but before you print a design on an envelope, you must make sure it fits within the U.S. Postal Service's regulations. If you are ordering envelopes for a business, you will more than likely be mailing multiple pieces at one time. Failure to comply with regulations can result in the return of your mail, or additional charges from the post office. You can get away with some wacky designs if you are planning to pay First Class postage for every piece. But in order to qualify for discounted bulk rates, you had better listen to what the man says! We will attempt to warn you of some of the pitfalls here, but you should contact your local post office with any further questions (the USPS website is not very helpful).

The Major Postal Regulations Pertaining to Envelopes:
https://www.phcolorsorter.com/html/en/products/graincolorsorter/707.html
The OCR Read Area -Your address on the reply envelope needs to be within the area that the postal machines read. This is called the OCR read area. If you are unsure whether your address fits, you can go to the post office and look at one of their plastic templates. Your printer probably owns one of these templates and can make sure you are within the read area. However, if you design the address too big or otherwise out of the area, pre-press may have to shrink it or move it for you, which could result in charges.
The Return Address - Most return addresses will fit within guidelines, but if you have a particularly large logo in the corner, plus an address underneath, the address may be "out of postals" as we call it in the biz. This is usually OK in most cases. In fact if you are paying first class postage you can put it anywhere on the left or even on the back flap. But if you plan to send bulk mail or pre-paid postage, you had better comply with regulations! Your logo may have to be shrunk to fit the address up into the corner, or you can move the address to the right of the logo so you don't have to lose any size from your precious design. All this is because the bottom line of the address (city, state, zip) needs to be at least 2-3/4 inches from the bottom of the envelope, because that's where the readers will look for it if your bulk mailings get returned.
FIMs and Postnets - Also known as "those lines at the top" and "barcodes," which need to go on some reply envelopes. The FIMs (facing identification marks) help the post office identify what kind of mail is being sent, and the postnets are a barcode for your ZIP+4 code. Find out what kind of FIM you need (or if you need one at all), and provide an accurate ZIP+4 to get a postnet. If you don't have the software to make these yourself, pre-press can make them for you (for a fee). These need to fit into their own read areas, with a much smaller margin of error than address info. Pre-press can put them there, but make sure you don't have background designs all over the envelope that are going to conflict with printed codes and other important stuff. Save the fancy designs for the mailings inside the envelope!
Business Reply Mail and Postal Indicias - If you are a big business you've probably done BREs and have your own pre-paid permit number. If this is all Greek to you, than it would be best to contact the post office if you are interested in Business Reply Mail or other types of pre-paid postage. If you get a permit number and have no idea what to do with it, pre-press can make an indicia (the little thing in the corner that says POSTAGE PAID US PRE-SORT PERMIT NO. blah blah...) or a BRE graphic for your envelope (again, for a fee). They can also make you one of those little indicias that tells your customer PLACE STAMP HERE, just in case your customers are the kind that forget things like that...

Ok, you can stop sweating now. Most of this wont apply if you are just a little guy getting #10 envelopes for regular mailings. Now we can move onto the fun part.

Your Return Address Design

By far the most common thing printed on an envelope is a simple return address, sometimes with a logo. Aside from the return address information above, there are a few things that you need to pay attention to as far as the printing process goes.
https://www.phcolorsorter.com/html/en/products/graincolorsorter/686.html

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.